Creative Space and COVID-19

With all that’s been going on lately, we’ve had to re-evaluate how we run the business and find a new way of working. So we’ve come up with a new business model that aims to keep everyone safe. We’ve been successfully using Zoom for face-to-face meetings and webinars. We’ve been able to offer all ofContinue reading “Creative Space and COVID-19”

An all new astronomy show for GCSE students

The power of family engagement at it’s best: how my daughter became the inspiration for a new planetarium show. With my youngest daughter having just started her GCSEs, she spent a good part of last year deciding on her options. It was predetermined that she would study Triple Science, giving her a deeper understanding of physics.Continue reading “An all new astronomy show for GCSE students”

Glowing rings of a dying star

Researchers have found the remains of a planetary system orbiting a white dwarf star. Researchers from the University of Warwick have acquired the first direct image of a debris disc in orbit around the core of a burnt out star. The white dwarf star, SDSS1228+1040, lies about 463 lightyears away in the constellation of Virgo. AlthoughContinue reading “Glowing rings of a dying star”

Cosmic twins

Supernova pairs have been used to accurately measure cosmological distances. Within the last 20 years, astronomers have discovered that the Universe is expanding at an ever increasing rate due to dark energy. One technique used to detect this increase is to measure the distances to bright supernovae. Only a Type 1a supernova is used forContinue reading “Cosmic twins”

The Pleiades

Bringing a little sparkle to the autumn nights. The Pleiades is an open star cluster in the constellation of Taurus. This enigmatic group of stars is known by many names; the Seven Sisters, Messier 45, and Melotte 22 to name but a few. The Pleiades rise in the east just after sunset from the beginning ofContinue reading “The Pleiades”

Eclipse of the supermoon

It’s not often, in southern England, that we get the chance to see a total eclipse of the Moon. But in the early hours of Monday 28th September, I was lucky enough to witness a triple lunar event. Not only was it a total lunar eclipse, it was the largest supermoon of 2015 (being closest to Earth onContinue reading “Eclipse of the supermoon”

A mysterious binary star

An enormous magnetic binary star system has been discovered by Canadian PhD student, Matt Shultz of Queen’s University, Ontario. The object is unusual because giant stars rarely have magnetic fields; and giant binary stars with magnetism are even less common, accounting for only about 2% of stars in the Milky Way. The discovery was made usingContinue reading “A mysterious binary star”

A shattered lunar landscape

Astronomers using gravity maps from NASA’s twin GRAIL (Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory) satellites have discovered that the Moon’s upper crust – the megaregolith –  is highly porous. The GRAIL satellites, Ebb and Flow, determined the Moon’s gravity field by measuring tiny movements of the spacecraft due to the push and pull of gravity uponContinue reading “A shattered lunar landscape”

Rosetta: The comet chaser

There are not many space missions that have touched the hearts and minds of people throughout the world as much as Rosetta. Named after the Rosetta Stone – a slab of volcanic basalt responsible for revealing the mysteries of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics – this intrepid comet chaser has inspired a generation of science explorers, uncovering mysteries bound up in its icy companion, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.